Still unsure.

For a guy who still doesn't know exactly what he wants to do for a living, I've been pretty fortunate to spend so many years paying the bills by being on the radio.

Credit: Alessandro Cerino on Unsplash
Credit: Alessandro Cerino on Unsplash
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In the mid 80's I moved to Missoula to go to college and shortly after I got to town I landed a job at a radio station. The salary was small but there were other ways to supplement my income. I did play-by-play for the local high school basketball games. I also did remote broadcasts, but the job that paid the best was wearing the station moose suit. That it was brutal to wear at events in the summertime, but it paid ten bucks an hour. So, I signed up for moose duty whenever I could get it.

Credit: Richard Lee on Unsplash
Credit: Richard Lee on Unsplash
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Coulda, shoulda, woulda.

I ran across an article today that made me think that I should have followed up on being a mascot.

Apparently, Hugo The Hornet of the Charlotte Hornets makes $100,000.00 a year. Go The Gorilla of the Phoenix Suns makes 200,000.00 annually. The king of mascots, pay-wise, is Rocky The Mountain Lion who works for the Denver Nuggets. He makes $625,000.00 a year.

Credit: Jonathan Cooper on Unsplash
Credit: Jonathan Cooper on Unsplash
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But I don't know what else a mascot is contractually obligated to do. Do you have to show up to practice like the players do? Do mascots ever go on injured reserve?

I would imagine that you'd be required to attend all parades, and events at schools and hospitals. And of course, be present for any photo ops.

I should have stuck with it. I could've been rich.

Big Sky Conference Mascots Ranked on How Easily I Could Beat Them in a Fight

I came up with a random thought the other day. "If I were to get in a fight with every mascot in the Big Sky Conference, how many of those fights could I win?" For clarification: I am fighting whatever animal/person the team's nickname is (Grizzlies, Bobcats, etc.) in a one-on-one setting. No outside weapons being used, just a classic mano e mano fight.

What I've learned is I have very little chance at winning most of these fights.

Gallery Credit: Ace Sauerwein

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