It's interesting how urban legends/myths gain traction.

Surely you've seen those big tin stars on the sides of houses and barns around Montana. Maybe you even have one at your place. Well, apparently that means the people that live there are swingers. Yup, good old-fashioned spouse swappers. Now, before you scramble up a ladder and promptly take down your embarrassing star... keep reading. Because it does not mean you like to get freaky with other couples.

Credit: Kelsey Nistel, TSM/Getty Images/Canva
Credit: Kelsey Nistel, TSM/Getty Images/Canva
loading...

The history of the barn star has nothing to do with sex.

According to Wide Open Country, the barn star in the United States originated from German immigrants who placed the stars on their buildings to ward off evil. The decorative piece is known by different monikers, depending on where you live. Most have five points, while the six-point stars are less common. Some call them Amish Barn Stars, Pennsylvania Barn Stars, or simply Barnstars. Originally they were painted on the building, but in the 1930s and 40s farmers started using tin to make the stars and attach them to their barns.

Get our free mobile app
Photo by Kelly Sikkema on Unsplash/Canva
Photo by Kelly Sikkema on Unsplash/Canva
loading...

The colors of the star have various non-swinger meanings.

Supposedly, different colored barn stars represent different things. None of them involve swinging. According to TasteOfHome.com,

  • Green star = hope for growth and fertility on the farm
  • Blue or black star = protection for the farm
  • Yellow star = love
  • Brown star = friendship and strength
  • White star = purity and energy
  • Violet star = considered holy

So feel free to put up that giant tin star on the side of your house or barn. Just be careful if you're considering a pineapple sign. Especially one that's upside down.

H/T K99

LOOK: The oldest cities in America

Though the United States doesn’t have as long of a history as some Old World countries, it still has plenty of historical charm. Stacker brings you a list of the 50 oldest cities in America.

More From Montana Talks